US announces $1 bln in military aid for Ukraine, one of largest weapons packages yet

The US announced one of its largest weapons packages for Ukraine on Monday, with the Pentagon estimating the new aid to be worth $1 billion.

Monday’s announcement will be in addition to the $8.8 billion in military aid that the US has given Ukraine since last year.

“This is the largest single drawdown of US arms and equipment utilizing this authority to date,” Under Secretary of Defense for Policy Colin Kahl told reporters.

The package will include ammunition for High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems (HIMARS), NASAMS surface-to-air missile system ammunition and as many as 50 M113 armored medical transports.

Secretary of State Antony Blinken said this was the eighteenth drawdown from the Pentagon’s stockpile since August 2021.

“Nearly six months into the unprovoked and brutal assault on Ukraine, Russia continues its destruction of Ukrainian towns and villages,” Blinken said in a statement. “President Biden has been clear that we will continue to support the Ukrainian people as they defend their country from Russian aggression, for as long as it takes.”

The Pentagon said the weapons will include:

  • Additional ammunition for HIMARS
  • 75,000 rounds of 155mm artillery ammunition
  • 20 120mm mortar systems and 20,000 rounds of 120mm mortar ammunition
  • Munitions for National Advanced Surface-to-Air Missile Systems (NASAMS)
  • 1,000 Javelin and hundreds of AT4 anti-armor systems
  • 50 armored medical treatment vehicles
  • Claymore anti-personnel munitions
  • C-4 explosives, demolition munitions, and demolition equipment
  • Medical supplies, to include first aid kits, bandages, monitors, and other equipment.

Kahl, the Pentagon official, said the US believes the Russians have suffered between 70,000 and 80,000 casualties in six months. “I think that they certainly assumed that they could steamroll over Ukraine in a matter of days or weeks. It now turns out to have been a profound miscalculation. The Ukrainians are doing more than holding their own, and I expect that that trend will continue,” Kahl said.

Related Articles

Back to top button