Ukraine plans on summer counteroffensive to oust Russian forces

The eighteenth week of Russia’s war in Ukraine saw momentous geopolitical developments, compared with marginal Russian gains on the ground.

The European Union formally bestowed candidate status on Ukraine and Moldova on June 23. They had both applied within a week of Russia’s attack on Ukraine in February.

The eighteenth week of Russia’s war in Ukraine saw momentous geopolitical developments, compared with marginal Russian gains on the ground.

The European Union formally bestowed candidate status on Ukraine and Moldova on June 23. They had both applied within a week of Russia’s attack on Ukraine in February.

Once again, the speed of acceptance was unprecedented.

NATO also announced it will expand its readiness forces from 40,000 to “well over” 300,000 soldiers, and with more pre-positioned equipment and stockpiles, more forward-deployed air defence, and new defence planning.

It is clear that while Ukraine is not being invited into NATO, it is coming firmly under the alliance’s security umbrella.

“Over the longer term, we will help Ukraine transition from Soviet-era equipment, to modern NATO equipment,” NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said.

NATO expansion is precisely the reason Russian President Vladimir Putin cited for invading Ukraine.

On June 27, the world’s seven wealthiest nations, the G7, issued their most strident support for Ukraine yet, calling on Russia to withdraw to “internationally recognised boundaries”, in other words, to abandon its 2014 annexations of Crimea and Donbas, in addition to withdrawing from the parts of Ukraine it has taken this year.

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