Moscow widens attacks on cities

  • Russian strikes have hit several cities, including Dnipro for what appears to be the first time.
  • Emergency services in the east-central city said at least one person was killed in strikes that allegedly hit a kindergarten, residential building and shoe factory.
  • Russian forces approaching Kyiv appear to have repositioned and edged closer to the capital, according to satellite imagery and intelligence assessments by the United States.
  • Ukraine hopes to open a humanitarian corridor from the besieged southeastern port city of Mariupol in order to allow civilians facing increasingly dire conditions there to evacuate to safety.
  • More than 2.5 million people have fled Ukraine since Russia launched its offensive, according to the United Nations.

    UN rights office has ‘credible reports’ of Russia using cluster munitions

    The UN’s human rights office (OHCHR) says it has received “credible reports” of several cases of Russian forces using cluster munitions in populated areas in Ukraine, adding that indiscriminate use of such weapons might amount to war crimes.

    “Due to their wide area effects, the use of cluster munitions in populated areas is incompatible with the international humanitarian law principles governing the conduct of hostilities,” OHCHR spokeswoman Liz Throssell told reporters at the agency’s headquarters in Geneva.

    “We remind the Russian authorities that directing attacks against civilians and civilian objects, as well as so-called area bombardment in towns and villages and other forms of indiscriminate attacks, are prohibited under international law and may amount to war crimes.”

    No casualties in eastern Ukraine psychiatric hospital strike, emergency service says

    An alleged Russian air raid on a psychiatric hospital in Ukraine’s eastern Kharkiv region has caused no casualties, according to the country’s State Emergency Service.

    “All 30 staff and 330 patients were in a bomb shelter at the time of the strike,” the service said in a statement.

    Kremlin warns Meta will have to cease work in Russia if Reuters report is true

    Moscow will end the activities of Meta Platforms in Russia if a report that it will allow users of its social media sites in some countries to call for violence against Russians and Russian soldiers proves true, the Kremlin has said.

    Citing leaked internal emails, the Reuters news agency reported on Thursday that Meta will allow Facebook and Instagram users in some countries to call for violence against Russians and Russian soldiers in the context of the Ukraine invasion, signalling a temporary change to its hate speech policy.

    “We don’t want to believe the Reuters report – it is just too difficult to believe,” Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters.

    “We hope it is not true because if it is true then it will mean that there will have to be the most decisive measures to end the activities of this company,” he added.

    What do we know about Ukraine’s use of Turkish Bayraktar drones?

    Ankara, which has good relations with both Moscow and Kyiv, has sold dozens of its combat drones to Ukraine since 2019.

    Izyum psychiatric hospital hit by Russian strike, regional governor says

    Russian forces have struck a psychiatric hospital near the eastern Ukrainian town of Izyum, according to a regional official who described the alleged attack as a “war crime”.

    Oleh Synegubov, the governor of the Kharkiv region, said 330 people had been at the hospital at the time of the attack. He added that 73 people had been evacuated and that the number of casualties was being established.

    “This is a war crime against civilians,” Synegubov wrote on the Telegram messaging app.

    Al Jazeera was unable to independently verify Synegubov’s claim.

    Kharkiv mayor says city under ‘non-stop bombardment’

    The mayor of Ukraine’s northeastern city of Kharkiv says it is under “non-stop bombardment” from Russian forces.

    Ihor Terekhov said in a televised interview that at least 48 of Kharkiv’s schools had been destroyed amid the attacks.

    Terekhov’s remarks came as Synegubov claimed Russian forces had shelled residential areas of the city – Ukraine’s second-largest – 89 times in one day.

    It was not immediately clear which day Synegubov was referring to.

    UN rights office has ‘credible reports’ of Russia using cluster munitions

    The UN’s human rights office (OHCHR) says it has received “credible reports” of several cases of Russian forces using cluster munitions in populated areas in Ukraine, adding that indiscriminate use of such weapons might amount to war crimes.

    “Due to their wide area effects, the use of cluster munitions in populated areas is incompatible with the international humanitarian law principles governing the conduct of hostilities,” OHCHR spokeswoman Liz Throssell told reporters at the agency’s headquarters in Geneva.

    “We remind the Russian authorities that directing attacks against civilians and civilian objects, as well as so-called area bombardment in towns and villages and other forms of indiscriminate attacks, are prohibited under international law and may amount to war crimes.”

    No casualties in eastern Ukraine psychiatric hospital strike, emergency service says

    An alleged Russian air raid on a psychiatric hospital in Ukraine’s eastern Kharkiv region has caused no casualties, according to the country’s State Emergency Service.

    “All 30 staff and 330 patients were in a bomb shelter at the time of the strike,” the service said in a statement.


    Kremlin warns Meta will have to cease work in Russia if Reuters report is true

    Moscow will end the activities of Meta Platforms in Russia if a report that it will allow users of its social media sites in some countries to call for violence against Russians and Russian soldiers proves true, the Kremlin has said.

    Citing leaked internal emails, the Reuters news agency reported on Thursday that Meta will allow Facebook and Instagram users in some countries to call for violence against Russians and Russian soldiers in the context of the Ukraine invasion, signalling a temporary change to its hate speech policy.

    “We don’t want to believe the Reuters report – it is just too difficult to believe,” Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters.

    “We hope it is not true because if it is true then it will mean that there will have to be the most decisive measures to end the activities of this company,” he added.

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