Is the Nagorno-Karabakh war really over?

In just 40 days, Azerbaijan got what it had been fighting for on the desolate, sun-parched hillsides and at diplomatic conferences for almost 30 years.

A hastily signed deal between the oil-rich Caspian nation and its impoverished, resource-poor neighbour and longtime enemy, Armenia, put an abrupt end to a six-week-long conflict over Nagorno-Karabakh, a mountainous enclave dominated by ethnic Armenians since the early 1990s.

According to the Russia-brokered truce, Armenian forces will withdraw from the territory they still control within Azerbaijani districts around Nagorno-Karabakh.

Azerbaijan will keep all the areas it recaptured since the conflict flared up on September 27, including Shusha, the region’s second-largest city, known to Armenians as Shushi.

Russian peacekeepers will guard a route linking Armenia and Nagorno-Karabakh.

More importantly – and humiliatingly for Armenia – Yerevan agreed to give Baku a new transit corridor through southern Armenia to Azerbaijan’s southwestern exclave of Nakhichevan, the birthplace of many key politicians, including late President Heydar Aliyev, who was succeeded by his son Ilham.

As euphoric crowds throughout Azerbaijan celebrate the “capitulation”, as described by the Azeri leader, and two dozen Russian planes deliver the peacekeepers, Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan’s government is plunged into the political abyss it may never climb out of.Enraged protesters stormed into his residence, the parliament building and pillaged government offices on Monday night, demanding his resignation.

A top Armenian official warned the protesters in Yerevan to abstain from any “coup attempts”.

“If necessary, this government will go, a new government will be elected, but our team and I personally cannot allow any coup attempts,” Deputy Prime Minister Tigran Avinian said in televised remarks on Wednesday.Enraged protesters stormed into his residence, the parliament building and pillaged government offices on Monday night, demanding his resignation.

A top Armenian official warned the protesters in Yerevan to abstain from any “coup attempts”.

“If necessary, this government will go, a new government will be elected, but our team and I personally cannot allow any coup attempts,” Deputy Prime Minister Tigran Avinian said in televised remarks on Wednesday.

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