Dozens of stranded Rohingya refugees land in Bangladesh

Local people tipped off the coastguard and 29 people were arrested and about 10 fled, police and security officials said.

Chris Lewa, director of the Arakan Project monitoring group, said the group that landed on Saturday had likely come on a small boat from one of the larger vessels still at sea, believed to be carrying hundreds of people.

The two trawlers – carrying an estimated 500 Rohingya women, men and children – were stuck in the Bay of Bengal after being rejected by Malaysia, which has imposed restrictions on all boats in light of the coronavirus pandemic.

Bangladesh has refused to let the fishing boats land on its territory despite United Nations calls to allow them in as a powerful storm bears down on the region.

Shobbir Ahmed, a Rohingya at one of the refugee camps in southeast Bangladesh’s Cox’s Bazar told AFP news agency that two of his daughters who had been on the stranded boats were among those who landed on Saturday.

He said the women, aged 19 and 17, had boarded a trawler two months ago trying to get to Malaysia. Ahmed said he paid a Rohingya intermediary about $2,230 for them to make the trip.

Local people tipped off the coastguard and 29 people were arrested and about 10 fled, police and security officials said.

Chris Lewa, director of the Arakan Project monitoring group, said the group that landed on Saturday had likely come on a small boat from one of the larger vessels still at sea, believed to be carrying hundreds of people.

The two trawlers – carrying an estimated 500 Rohingya women, men and children – were stuck in the Bay of Bengal after being rejected by Malaysia, which has imposed restrictions on all boats in light of the coronavirus pandemic.

Bangladesh has refused to let the fishing boats land on its territory despite United Nations calls to allow them in as a powerful storm bears down on the region.

Shobbir Ahmed, a Rohingya at one of the refugee camps in southeast Bangladesh’s Cox’s Bazar told AFP news agency that two of his daughters who had been on the stranded boats were among those who landed on Saturday.

He said the women, aged 19 and 17, had boarded a trawler two months ago trying to get to Malaysia. Ahmed said he paid a Rohingya intermediary about $2,230 for them to make the trip.

Local people tipped off the coastguard and 29 people were arrested and about 10 fled, police and security officials said.

Chris Lewa, director of the Arakan Project monitoring group, said the group that landed on Saturday had likely come on a small boat from one of the larger vessels still at sea, believed to be carrying hundreds of people.

The two trawlers – carrying an estimated 500 Rohingya women, men and children – were stuck in the Bay of Bengal after being rejected by Malaysia, which has imposed restrictions on all boats in light of the coronavirus pandemic.

Bangladesh has refused to let the fishing boats land on its territory despite United Nations calls to allow them in as a powerful storm bears down on the region.

Shobbir Ahmed, a Rohingya at one of the refugee camps in southeast Bangladesh’s Cox’s Bazar told AFP news agency that two of his daughters who had been on the stranded boats were among those who landed on Saturday.

He said the women, aged 19 and 17, had boarded a trawler two months ago trying to get to Malaysia. Ahmed said he paid a Rohingya intermediary about $2,230 for them to make the trip.

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