Abdul Hamid Dbeibah: Who is Libya’s new prime minister?

Abdul Hamid Dbeibah, a businessman-turned-politician, has been chosen as Libya’s new interim prime minister following lengthy United Nations-sponsored talks aimed at ending a decade of conflict in the North African country.

Dbeibah, along with a three-member Presidential Council, will have the crucial and difficult task of preparing the ground for fair and transparent national elections in December, as well as ensuring the safe participation of Libyans in the electoral process.

Abdul Hamid Dbeibah, a businessman-turned-politician, has been chosen as Libya’s new interim prime minister following lengthy United Nations-sponsored talks aimed at ending a decade of conflict in the North African country.

Dbeibah, along with a three-member Presidential Council, will have the crucial and difficult task of preparing the ground for fair and transparent national elections in December, as well as ensuring the safe participation of Libyans in the electoral process.

Dbeibah, largely seen as an outsider compared with the other candidates, now faces an ambitious and challenging programme.

He has 21 days to form a cabinet and another three weeks to win a vote of confidence in parliament.

By March 19, at the latest, he should be ready to forge ahead with a 10-month transition aimed at preparing the country for elections on December 24.

Speaking by videoconference to the meeting in Switzerland before Friday’s vote, the 61-year-old pledged to “use education and training as a path towards stability”.

“We will work so that security organs are professional and weapons are placed under the monopoly of the state,” he said.

Dbeibah has also promised to set up a ministry of “national reconciliation” to woo back foreign investors and create jobs for the young.

He has set a target of ending “within six months at the most” the daily power cuts that have plagued Libya for years.

World powers, including the United States and Russia, welcomed the vote in Geneva, but some analysts, and Libyans themselves, remain sceptical.

Dbeibah, largely seen as an outsider compared with the other candidates, now faces an ambitious and challenging programme.

He has 21 days to form a cabinet and another three weeks to win a vote of confidence in parliament.

By March 19, at the latest, he should be ready to forge ahead with a 10-month transition aimed at preparing the country for elections on December 24.

Speaking by videoconference to the meeting in Switzerland before Friday’s vote, the 61-year-old pledged to “use education and training as a path towards stability”.

“We will work so that security organs are professional and weapons are placed under the monopoly of the state,” he said.

Dbeibah has also promised to set up a ministry of “national reconciliation” to woo back foreign investors and create jobs for the young.

He has set a target of ending “within six months at the most” the daily power cuts that have plagued Libya for years.

World powers, including the United States and Russia, welcomed the vote in Geneva, but some analysts, and Libyans themselves, remain sceptical.

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